👋 I am disabling input while I build a new version that does not rely on Twitter's $100 / mo API.

Twitter's New API Access Tiers Draws Criticism

Critics have raised concerns over Twitter's newly announced self-serve access tiers for their API due to its high cost and potential risks associated with it such as data breaches and misuse of information

A cartoon image depicting a person holding up a sign reading "No To Twitter's New API Access Tiers"

A cartoon image depicting a person holding up a sign reading "No To Twitter's New API Access Tiers"

Twitter has recently announced the launch of their new self-serve access tiers for their API. This includes a Basic (v2) access tier for hobbyists with 10,000 GET/month and 50,000 POST/month, 2 app IDs, and Login with Twitter for $100/month. While this may seem like a great deal to some users, many have expressed criticism over the new plan. Critics argue that the cost of the new plan is too high for what it offers. They point out that other social media platforms offer similar services at much lower prices or even free of charge. Furthermore, they argue that this could lead to further consolidation in the industry as smaller players are unable to afford these expensive plans and will be forced out of business. Others have also raised concerns about how this could affect user privacy and data security. They fear that by allowing third-party companies access to user data through APIs, there is an increased risk of data breaches and misuse of information. This could potentially put users at risk of identity theft or other forms of cybercrime. Finally, some experts have argued that these new tiers are just another way for Twitter to make money off its users without providing any real value in return. They point out that while it may seem like a good deal on paper, in reality it is likely to be more trouble than it’s worth for most people who use the platform regularly. Overall, while Twitter’s new API access tiers may seem appealing on paper, many critics remain unconvinced about its true value and potential risks associated with it. Until more details emerge about how exactly these plans will work in practice, many remain skeptical about whether or not they are truly worth the price tag attached to them.